Wild Animals Don’t Belong in the Olympics

Russia is in the process of capturing wild whales and dolphins to be showcased at the 2014 Winter Olympics.

Russia is in the process of capturing wild whales and dolphins to be showcased at the 2014 Winter Olympics.

The Olympics is a time to celebrate the human athlete. Why then is Russia insisting on capturing animals in the wild to perform in the Sochi Dolphinarium as part of the 2014 Winter Olympics? Two killer whales were recently taken from the wild and will be showcased in the tank along with a wild caught and endangered Black Sea captive dolphin who is scheduled to carry the Olympic torch during opening ceremonies.

Taking animals from the wild and showcasing them in such a visible venue supports the destruction of these animals, their families, and their environment. Is that the message the International Olympic Committee wants to send to the world?

In addition, the Olympic Movement’s Agenda 21, Sport for Sustainable Development, focuses on respect for the environment. As the films Blackfish and The Cove clearly show, there is no respect for the environment or its inhabitants when whales and dolphins are chased until caught, with many of them dying in the process, while others are purposefully killed so the young can be taken for display in concrete bathtubs or confined to sea pens.

Write to the head of the International Olympic Committee urging the committee to reject the use of whales and dolphins in the ceremonies marking the 2014 Winter Olympics in Sochi, Russia. Additionally, write the ambassador from Russia to the United States, letting him know that you want his country to cease taking orcas and dolphins from the wild.

Thomas Bach, President
International Olympic Committee
Château de Vidy
Case postale 356
1001 Lausanne
Switzerland

The Honorable Sergey I. Kislyak
Ambassador
Embassy of the Russian Federation
2650 Wisconsin Avenue, NW
Washington, DC 20007

Belugas Belong in the Wild

The NOAA has denied a permit request to import 18 beluga whales from Russia into the Georgia Aquarium.

The NOAA has denied a permit request to import 18 beluga whales from Russia into the Georgia Aquarium.

PawsUpPaws Up!
To the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration for denying a U.S. aquarium’s request for a permit to import whales from Russia.

According to a news article, “Federal authorities have denied the Georgia Aquarium a permit to import 18 beluga whales from Russia, citing concerns about the species’ wild population and the way in which these marine mammals were captured.”

Additionally, “Beluga whales are listed as near threatened by the International Union for Conservation of Nature (IUCN). They are found in the arctic and subarctic waters of Russia, Greenland and North America and they face threats including ship strikes, pollution and habitat destruction, according to NOAA.”

The story stated that the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration received over 9,000 comments regarding the request for the permit.

Take Action: Write a note of thanks to the administrator of NOAA. Additionally, never visit a sea park that uses sea animals for entertainment purposes.

Dr. Jane Lubchenco
Administrator
National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration
1401 Constitution Avenue, NW
Room 5128
Washington, DC 20230

Belugas in Danger

Belugas living in captivity suffer shortened lifespans and reduced quality of life.

In July, we asked our followers to write the Georgia Aquarium president and chief operating officer requesting he withdraw the aquarium’s application for a permit to import 18 wild-caught belugas from Russia, supposedly for the purpose of conservation.

According to a news story, “…Georgia Aquarium’s permit application has little to do with conserving the species and has everything to do with breeding belugas for captivity and petting pools. This was even admitted by William Hurley, the aquarium’s chief zoological officer who confirmed that the 18 belugas will be used in a breeding program across all US facilities.”

We do not need to capture these animals and place them in pools. They are wild animals and should remain in the wild.

Please contact the National Oceanic and Atmospheric agency and express you position that the permit for the Georgia Aquarium should be denied. The public comment period closes October 29, 2012.

You may submit comments, identified by NOAA-NMFS-2012-0158, by any of the following methods:

Online: Submit all electronic public comments via the Federal e-Rulemaking Portal.

Mail: Submit written comments to:
Chief, Permits and Conservation Division
Office of Protected Resources
NOAA Fisheries
1315 East-West Highway, Room 13705
Silver Spring, MD 20910

Fax: 301-713-0376; Attn: Jennifer Skidmore

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A Bear’s Den Is His/Her Castle

Photo by Amber Wallace

In two widely diverse cultures, bears are being protected from hunters who enter their dens and shot them. In Russia, hunters will no longer be allowed to enter the dens of hibernating bears to shoot them. Bears give birth over winter. Therefore, when hunters shoot the mothers, the cubs are left orphaned often resulting in their deaths.

In Colorado, the Colorado Wildlife Commission has approved draft regulations prohibiting hunting of bears in their dens. The final vote will come May 5. Please write the commission chairman letting him know you support this regulation.

Tim Glenn, Chairman
Division of Wildlife Headquarters
6060 Broadway
Denver, Colorado, 80216

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