When you think about it…shouldn’t studies related to human beings be conducted using data from humans?

Shouldn't data from humans be used instead of animals in order to study our own kind?

Shouldn’t data from humans be used instead of animals in order to study our own kind?

Did you know that stressed rats drank more alcohol than non-stressed rats? How does knowing this help humans? Additionally, studies that test for the effects of nicotine on the lungs of baby mice or seek to understand the sexual preferences of hamsters seem a tad bit off the mark when it comes to extrapolating data for human use.

What are we gaining in improving the health and well-being of humans when we focus on the drinking, smoking, and sexual activities of rodents? These studies, which number in the hundreds if not the thousands, are often funded with taxpayer dollars.

There is little return on these investments of millions of dollars while at the same time there is a huge investment in animal abuse. And just as lab beakers and other laboratory equipment are often discarded when no longer of value, so too are the lives of these animals.

When you think about it…why are we studying mice when we should be studying humans? Why are we perpetuating animal abuse when humans are suffering and dying…shouldn’t studies related to human beings be conducted using data from humans?

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When you think about it…even one is too many.

A 2011 study revealed that many more companion animals were euthanized in shelters than the public believed.

A 2011 study revealed that many more companion animals were euthanized in shelters than the public believed.

PetSmart Charities commissioned a study in 2011 to look at attitudes regarding pet adoption and spay/neuter. One of the great misconceptions the research identified is how many cats and dogs the public believes are euthanized in animal shelters across the country versus how many actually are. In a similar study in 2009, the public estimated 1.5 million companion animals are euthanized yearly; in 2011, the number dropped to 1.2 million. Unfortunately, the estimated number of companion animals euthanized yearly is 4 million. According to the study, 88 percent of those taking part underestimated the number.

Adopting from shelters and spaying/neutering companion animals will help reduce the number of healthy, adoptable animals killed in shelters every year in this country. But, when you think about it…even one death is too many; 4 million is an atrocity.

Saving Animals While Saving Humans

PawsUp

Many medical facilities in the US are finding alternatives to using live animals for research.

Many medical facilities in the U.S. are finding alternatives to using live animals for research.

Paws Up!
To the Uniformed Services University of the Health Sciences for no longer using live animals in their undergraduate medical curriculum.

According to a recent news article, “A U.S. military medical school in Bethesda says it no longer uses live animals in its training programs, starting with this school year.”

With so many alternatives to animal testing, we applaud all medical organizations and research facilities for phasing out testing on animals. However, some medical schools still use animals in their classrooms.

Take Action: Write a note of thanks to the Uniformed Services University of the Health Sciences.

Colonel Lisa K. Moores, MD, FCCP
Acting Associate Dean
Uniformed Services University of the Health Sciences
4301 Jones Bridge Rd.
Bethesda, MD 20814

Let these schools of medicine know your feelings about using animals for teaching students about human medicine.

Paul B. Rothman, M.D.
Dean of the Medical Faculty
Chief Executive Officer of Johns Hopkins Medicine
Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine
c/o The Johns Hopkins University
3400 N. Charles St.
Baltimore, MD 21218

Charles Wilhoite, Chairman
Board of Directors
c/o Oregon Health and Science University School of Medicine
3181 SW Sam Jackson Park Rd.
Portland, OR 97239

Daniel W. Jones, MD
Chancellor
University of Mississippi Medical Center
2500 N State St.
Jackson, MS 39216

Dean Stern, MD
Executive Dean
University of Tennessee Health
Science Center College of Medicine
956 Court Ave.
Memphis, TN 38103

Airline Soars

PawsUp

Philippine Airlines has now joined several others in ending the transportation of primates for research purposes.

Philippine Airlines has now joined several others in ending the transportation of primates for research purposes.

Paws Up!
To Philippine Airlines for joining with other air carriers that are refusing to transport primates for research purposes.

According to a news article, “…Philippine Airlines announc[ed] that it will end the transportation of primates for the purposes of cruel research and experimentation.”

Air France and China Southern Airlines are the only two carriers still transporting primates for research purposes.

The article went on to state, “[Philippine Airlines] reaffirmed that it is not currently engaged in the transport of wild, endangered, or threatened animals, regardless of their purpose.”

Take Action: The best action to take is to let organizations whose policies towards animals are in concert with yours know that you appreciate their actions. It’s also good to let those organizations whose policies toward animals are in conflict with your own know that you will not patronize them.

Lucio Tan, Chairman and CEO
Philippine Airlines, CEO
Corp. Communications Dept.
3F Mezzanine PNB Financial Center
Pres. Diosdado Macapagal Avenue
CCP Complex, Pasay City
Philippines
Tele. No.: 632-777-5995; 777-4800 loc 5401
Fax: 632-556-1893
E-mail: corpcomms@pal.com.ph

When you think about it…times are maybe changing!

While many companies have found alternatives to animal testing, there are still many others that continue to value their use in laboratories.

While many companies have found alternatives to animal testing, there are still many others that continue to value  this laboratory practice.

When a former director of the National Institutes of Health says it’s time to dial back animal experimentation for human diseases, you know times are changing. Dr. Elias Zerhouni said, “We need to refocus and adapt new methodologies for use in humans to understand disease biology in humans.” However, it’s business as usual, and beyond, in the United Kingdom, according to a recent article.

We have airlines refusing to transport primates for research purposes. Philippine Airline recently joined a long list of those refusing to do so, but there are still some holdouts.

So, are animals getting a break in the laboratory? Yes and no. Just depends on which organization, institute, or laboratory you’re talking about. Many animals still suffer for our beauty; others do not. Unfortunately, millions suffer through drug trials. These trials often prove nothing. The research animal is not adversely affected by a drug that when introduced into the human community causes adverse reactions ranging from diarrhea to death.

So, when you think about it…times are maybe changing but not for many research animals and not for many humans who suffer from adverse reactions to “safe” drugs and procedures.

Air France: Stop Transporting Animals to Laboratories

Is this plane carrying animals to research centers?

Is this plane carrying animals to research centers?

Air France continues to transport live primates to research laboratories around the world at the same time the National Institutes of Health is releasing many chimpanzees from research laboratories in the United States to appropriate, long-term sanctuaries. As more research organizations and countries end testing on laboratory animals for a variety of products, it’s time that Air France join with other airlines in refusing to transport animals for research purposes.

Write a polite note to the CEO of Air France urging him to discontinue shipping animals around the world for research purposes.

Alexander De Juniac, CEO
Air France
c/o US Headquarters
142 West 57th Street
New York, NY 10019

Cats Get a Breather

More colleges are replacing the use of live cats in medical training courses with alternatives such as human-based simulators.

More colleges in the United States are replacing the use of live cats in medical training courses with human-based alternatives.

PawsUpPaws Up!
To Washington University School of Medicine and St. Louis Children’s Hospital for deciding to stop using cats to teach medical students how to intubate infants.

According to a news story, “Washington University has stopped using live cats in a medical training course, a practice that some animal rights groups have long opposed.”

Across the United States, many medical-related courses that once used live animals as test subjects are now being taught using only human-based simulators. For instance, in over 95 percent of the Advanced Trauma Life Support classes taught in this country, non-animal models, such as the TraumaMan System and SimMan, and cadavers are being used in place of live animals. Where infant training is concerned, validated and human-based alternatives, such as Gaumard’s Premie HALL and PREMIE Blue, exist and should be used in place of live animal experimentation.

According to Dr. John Pippin, Physicians Committee for Responsible Medicine, “It’s especially inhumane and especially indefensible [to use live animals] when there are alternatives in hand which not only would spare the animals the trauma of going through this but also would provide a better educational experience.”

It’s time to do no harm in medical schools.

Take Action: Write a note of thanks to the Washington University School of Medicine and the St. Louis Children’s Hospital for deciding to spare the lives of cats. If you know of a medical school where animals are still being used to teach skills needed on humans, write to the dean and suggest he or she follow Washington University School of Medicine’s lead.

Larry J. Shapiro, MD
Executive Vice Chancellor for Medical Affairs and Dean
Washington University School of Medicine
660 S Euclid Ave, St Louis, MO 63110

J Eric Gordon, MD, co-chief of service
Perry L Schoenecker, MD, co-chief of service
St. Louis Children’s Hospital
One Children’s Place
St. Louis, MO 63110

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