Some FL Counties Partnering with TNR Programs to Reduce Euthanasia

pawsupPaws Up!
To Volusia County Animal Control for implementing TNR to reduce feral cat numbers.

TNR programs prevent feral cats from reproducing, reducing disease and populations over time.

TNR programs prevent feral cats from reproducing, reducing rates of disease and populations over time.

Last year, Volusia County Animal Control in central Florida picked up 2,360 feral cats, nearly all of whom were euthanized due to the impracticality of feral cat adoption. According to a recent news article, Volusia County Animal Control Director Sergio Pacheco wants to reduce shelter crowding and euthanasia rates by implementing Trap-Neuter-Release (TNR).

Volusia County Animal Control is partnering with the nonprofit organization, Concerned Citizens for Animal Welfare (CCAW), to capture feral cats. The cats will then be taken to CCAW’s mobile clinic for spay/neuter procedures and vaccinations. Afterward, the cats will be returned to the outdoors and monitored by a volunteer caregiver. As an added benefit, the county animal shelter will save precious space for other animals and be spared the financial expense of feral cat euthanasia – which cost the county over $200,000 last year. The Animal Control office in nearby Lake County is also interested in the TNR option, but would first have to revise a local ordinance to clarify that TNR does not constitute unlawful release of a cat. Other nearby counties are not pursuing the option at this time due to doubts about whether the community would support TNR.

Take Action: Contact your local animal control to express your support of TNR to reduce feral cat populations.

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End Greyhound Racing

Florida is one of seven states that still support greyhound racing. Seventy-four greyhounds involved with racing died during the last seven months of 2013.

Florida is one of seven states that still supports greyhound racing. Seventy-four greyhounds involved with racing died during the last seven months of 2013.

Greyhound racing is legal and operational in only seven states: Iowa, Arizona, Texas, Arkansas, Alabama, West Virginia, and Florida. A recent report on the state of greyhound racing in Florida shows that 74 greyhounds died over the last seven months of 2013. Should placing a $2 bet be more important than the lives of living, breathing, sentient beings?

Greyhound racing should be outlawed for many reasons because:
• Dogs suffer serious injuries during training and racing. These injuries are rarely treated.
• Dogs who are not able to race are often sold to laboratories or simply shot in the head.
• While on the racing circuit, dogs are continuously confined in cages barely large enough for them to move around in.

• Dogs are given minimal veterinary treatment and suffer from poor nutrition.
• To ensure dogs race well, trainers sometimes use performance-enhancing drugs.
• Live animals, usually rabbits, are used in greyhound training.

Florida residents, please let your legislators and governor know that you want to see Florida join with those states that have outlawed greyhound racing. Let them know that 74 deaths are 74 too many. Residents of the other six states, please do likewise. Let’s end greyhound racing in this country now.

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When you think about it…the answer is simple…stop greyhound racing.

Greyhounds are subjected to extreme conditions in the racing industry, and are often times put to death once they are no longer of use.

Greyhounds are subjected to extreme conditions in the racing industry and are often times put to death once they are no longer able to race.

While Florida has instituted stricter rules regarding the care and safety of racing greyhounds, greyhounds are still subjected to extreme conditions at many racing parks around the country. According to an article about greyhound racing, “at least 1,400 dogs [were] injured and 100 killed at Wheeling Island [WV] since 2008.”

Greyhounds were valued by Egyptian pharaohs for their grace, beauty, and gentle manner. Today, however, they often live their entire lives in kennels barely large enough for them to turn around in. They have little human contact except during training and when taken out of the kennels on race day. They have short careers and are usually shot at the end of them if they are not rescued.

Not only do the dogs suffer but there are other animals who suffer, too. Rabbits are often used to train greyhounds. They become lures and are killed by the dogs when caught. Nearly 100,000 live rabbits and other small animals are literally torn apart in live-lure training.

Even though there are numerous greyhound rescue groups around the country, there are not enough to protect all the dogs who either retire from the track or who wash out after one or two races.

Never visit a track, never support a track, never watch racing on television. Because when you think about it…the answer is simple…stop greyhound racing.

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Dirty Challenge: Pythons in Peril

PawsDown

Burmese pythons are a threathened species in Southeast Asia.

Burmese pythons are a threathened species in Southeast Asia.

Paws Down!
To the Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission (FWC) for supporting the killing of Burmese pythons in that state.

The Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission (FWC) has a partnership with the Python Challenge to remove Burmese pythons from the Florida Everglades. At first glance, this looks to be a noble attempt to save the Everglades, but what is not said is that the snakes will be killed. National Geographic News has commented that Florida’s great snake hunt is nothing more than a cheap stunt. The Burmese python is a vulnerably threatened species in Southeast Asia and is on the International Union for Conservation of Nature IUCN Red List of Threatened Species. Relocation is the best alternative to repopulate the species in Southeast Asia.

The Python Challenge website states, “Increasing public awareness about Burmese pythons and how this invasive species is a threat to the Everglades ecosystem, including native wildlife, is the goal of the 2013 Python Challenge™.” Increasing public awareness is an immense goal, but this Python Challenge is similar to a canned hunt and is an unwise way to broaden awareness about Burmese pythons and native wildlife.

The FWC is also offering prizes to the public for the killings of these pythons. The Python Challenge website continues, “The public also is invited to this upcoming free educational and exciting event in south Florida: The 2013 Python Challenge Awareness and Awards Event on Saturday, Feb. 16, 2013 at Zoo Miami.” The website also encourages people to share their Python Challenge photos.

Instead of killing pythons, the FWC should be capturing and relocating them to their native environment.

Take Action: Contact the executive director of the FWC and urge him to discontinue the Python Challenge’s current method of removal. Encourage the FWC to relocate these beautiful snakes back to their natural habitat to help Florida’s Everglades and the conservation status of the Burmese python.

Nick Wiley, Executive Director
Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission
620 South Meridian Street
Tallahassee, FL 32399-1600

When you think about it…nature creates the best colors for animals.

Pigeons’ colors don’t need our approval.

A recent story noted that pigeons in Venice, Italy, were dyed red, blue, and green as part of an International Architecture Biennale. They were lured to feeding stations where they were spray painted with food dye.

In April of this year, Rick Scott, governor of Florida, approved an agricultural bill that would allow the dyeing of animals neon green and dayglo pink. There had been a ban on dyeing animals for 45 years in Florida before it was overturned this year.

In China, the latest craze is to dye companion animals to look like wild animals. So a chow chow dog might be made to look like a panda or a retriever dyed to look like a tiger.

Let’s, for a moment, set aside the issue that the ingredients in some dyes might be harmful to companion animals. Let’s instead look at what it means for us to alter so dramatically the appearance of our companion that he or she no longer looks like the dog or a cat nature produced. What gives us the right to alter nature in such a way that our animal may actually be unrecognizable?

Nature did a pretty awesome job creating the various colors we find in our cats and dogs. Why would we want them to be pink, purple, blue, or green? If we cannot appreciate them for who they are in their natural state, what will changing their fur color do? When you think about it…nature creates the best colors for animals…not chemists.

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The Score Is Fish 0, Marlins -0

The beauty of these sea creatures is being cheapened by making them nothing more than a ballpark spectacle.

Paws Down!

To Marlins’ baseball team president David Samson for incorporating giant fish tanks in the new stadium design.

Can you image a baseball pitcher hurtling a ball at you at 104.8 mph? That’s the fastest speed ever recorded. While most pitchers don’t reach that speed, 90 mph is not unheard of. So, again, put yourself in the line of a 90 mph pitch coming straight at you.

That’s what is going to happen to the tropical fish at the new Marlins baseball stadium in Miami. The design of the stadium calls for two 20-foot-long tropical fish aquariums to be placed directly behind home plate.

While the president of the Marlins thinks such a design “screams Miami,” it also screams animal abuse. The beauty of these sea creatures is being cheapened by making them nothing more than a ballpark spectacle.

Take Action: Write a letter to Marlins’ president David Samson letting him know fish belong in the sea, not in a tank behind home plate.

David Samson, President
Miami Marlins
501 Marlins Way
Miami, FL 33125

Source:
The Huffington Post

 

SOS

Without measures to prevent the trade of shark fins within its borders, the United States will still contribute to the millions of sharks killed every year for their fins.

While the practice of finning sharks is illegal in the United States, current federal laws do not ban the trade in shark fins. Therefore, shark fins can be imported into this country. Each year, millions of sharks are killed for their fins, mostly to make shark fin soup. The sharks are pulled out of the water, their fins sliced off, and their bodies returned to the ocean. This barbaric industry has depleted shark populations by as much as 99 percent is some areas, threatening the delicate balance in our marine ecosystem.

New York State and Maryland residents, please contact your legislators and urge them to support bills currently before them. In New York State, the bill is A 7707a/S 6431and in Maryland it is SB 465/HB 393.

Florida, Illinois, and Virginia residents, contact your legislators as well since similar legislation has been introduced in those states.

Hawaii, California, Washington, and Oregon have already passed legislation restricting the trade of shark fins.

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