City Council of Hendersonville, NC, Passes New Limits on Dog Tethering

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To the City Council of Hendersonville, NC for increasing restrictions on dog-tethering within city limits.

Hendersonville, NC, is joining the list of towns in the United States that have passed restrictions on dogpuppy tethering. Keeping a dog on a chain for hours, days, and years at a time dramatically diminishes a dog’s psychological and physical welfare. Despite this, state laws seldom address the practice commonly known as “dog chaining” – leaving counties and cities to pass local ordinances to inhibit the harmful practice. In early July, city council members in Hendersonville, NC, which is home to about 13,500 people, unanimously voted to limit the amount of time a dog can be chained to no more than 2 hours in a 12-hour period. The minimum age for tethering puppies was also raised from 4 to 6 months.

Take action. Residents of Hendersonville, NC, contact your city council members and thank them for passing this important local law. Residents of other locales, contact your city council and county commission and urge them to place more restrictions on dog tethering in your area.

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Animal Welfare Laws May Increase in Pennsylvania

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To Senator Richard Alloway II and Senator John Eichelberger for working to improve animal welfare laws in the state of Pennsylvania.

In a recent news article, Senator Richard Alloway II proposed Senate Bill 373 and Senate Bill 78. S.B. 373, which would impose greater restrictions on animal tethering. The law would not allow owners to tether their dogs outside for more than 30 minutes when the temperature is below 32 degrees Fahrenheit. S.B. 78 would prevent immediate family members from applying for a kennel license if another family member has had one revoked. Senator John Eichelberger has proposed

If passed, Cordelia's Law would include horses in the states animal cruelty statues, along with other companion animals.

If passed, Cordelia’s Law would include horses in the states animal cruelty statues, along with other companion animals.

Senate Bill 294, named Cordelia’s Law, after a horse who starved to death while being tied up in a junkyard. S.B. 294 would be the first bill in Pennsylvania to include horses in animal cruelty laws.

Take Action: Pennsylvania residents contact your legislators and petition that S.B. 373, S.B. 78, and S.B. 294 be passed into law. Non-residents, contact your state to see what types of animal welfare laws have been passed and express your support for laws that will grant animals more protection.

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Natural Bridge Zoo in VA Reopens after Permit is Reinstated

Paws Down!

PawsDownTo the Virginia Department of Game and Inland Fisheries for re-instating The Natural Bridge Zoo’s permit to showcase wild animals.

Recently, NHES applauded Rockbridge County Circuit Judge Michael Irvine for refusing to allow the reopening of the Natural Bridge Zoo after the attraction was cited 44 times by the United States Department of Agriculture (USDA) for animal welfare violations. Now, according to a recent news article, the Virginia Department of Inland Fisheries has reinstated The Natural Bridge Zoo’s permit, after having revoked it not 90 days prior.tiger

Natural Bridge Zoo owner Karl Mogenson claims that in that brief period of time, he has “fixed” the abhorrent conditions that caused him to be cited for 44 violations under the Animal Welfare Act. He goes on to claim that the big cats, elephants, apes, and other animals in his possession are happy in his roadside zoo, which reopened May 30. Roadside zoos are a miserable substitute for a wild animal’s natural habitat, and those that fail to reach the AWA’s most basic requirements are undoubtedly unsuitable for animals that live there.

Take action. Virginia residents, contact the Virginia Department of Game and Inland Fisheries and express your displeasure at the reinstatement of The Natural Bridge Zoo’s permit.

Virginia Department of Game and Inland Fisheries
P.O. Box 996
Verona, VA 24482

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Alaska Bill Would Grant Pets Greater Legal Protection

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To Alaska House Representative Liz Vazquez for introducing a bill that would grant companion animalsgreater legal protection in the state of Alaska.

While most of us do not think of our companion animals in terms of being “personal property,” that is precisely how companion animals are still viewed in many cases heard by state and county courts. In

H.B. 147 would provide protection under restraining orders to pets of domestic violence victims.

H.B. 147 would provide protection under restraining orders to pets of domestic violence victims.

Alaska, a recently introduced H.B. 147 would not stop the law from viewing animals as property – but if passed, it would grant a higher legal protection for animals. For one, the bill introduced this spring by Rep. Liz Vazquez would require citizens convicted of animal cruelty or neglect to personally pay for the care provided to animals seized from their property. The bill

would also include animals in domestic violence protection orders. In civil cases involving divorce, the bill would create a statute requiring judges to consider the best interest of the animal when ruling on issues of ownership.

Take action. Residents of Alaska, contact your representatives and ask them to support H.B. 147, and other legislation that protects companion animals from violence and neglect.

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“Rocky’s Law” Establishes Animal Abuser Registry in Orange County, NY

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Pictured: Legislator Mike Anagnostakis of Orange County, NY, who introduced

Pictured: Legislator Mike Anagnostakis of Orange County, NY, who introduced “Rocky’s Law”
Photo by: Jim Sebastian, The Times Herald

To the county legislature of Orange County, NY, for enacting “Rocky’s Law,” which establishes an online registry of animal cruelty offenders and prohibits offenders from owning companion animals.

According to a recent news article, county legislators in Orange County, NY, have passed “Rocky’s Law” aimed to prevent cruelty to companion animals in the county. In April, Edwardo Macedowas of Newburgh, NY, was arrested after leaving his dog, “Rocky,” outside in the snow for a period of 5 weeks with no food or water while he was out of town for vacation. By the time help arrived, Rocky’s physical condition was so poor that he had to be euthanized.

Soon after, Orange County legislator Mike Anagostakis introduced the bill that would become “Rocky’s Law.” Under this law, Orange County residents convicted of animal cruelty will be named on an online registry and prohibited from owning a companion animal for fifteen years. Repeat offenders will be barred from owning a companion animal for life.

Take action. Orange County residents, contact the Orange County legislators  and thank them for passing “Rocky’s Law.” Residents of other counties, contact your county legislators and encourage them to enact public registries for convicted animal cruelty offenders.

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Ohio Introduces Dog Chaining Ban

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Paws Up!

To Ohio Representative John Barnes, Jr. for sponsoring a bill to ban continuous dog chaining in Ohio.

Dogs require daily socialization, exercise, and shelter to live happy lives.

Dogs require daily socialization, exercise, and shelter to live happy lives.



The practice of continually tethering pets outside for extended periods of time is known to be both harmful to animals and the communities they live in. Chained dogs are vulnerable to extreme boredom and frustration as result of isolation and lack of exercise. In addition to the psychological stress caused by long-term chaining, dogs who are chained continuously are vulnerable to extreme weather, attacks by other animals, and infestation by disease-carrying insects. Many dogs who are chained can also become entangled in the chain itself, resulting in injury and even strangulation. Dogs living under these conditions are not provided with opportunities to be good canine citizens and may be more likely to bark, lunge, or snap at passing people or other animals.

In an attempt to rescue dogs and other animals from the fate of life on a chain, Ohio Representative John Barnes, Jr. has introduced H.B. 94, also known as the Animal Protection Initiative. The bill was introduced to the Committee on Agriculture and Rural Development on March 4, 2015.  If passed into law, this bill would drastically limit the conditions under which an animal can be legally chained or tethered. Specifically, owners would not be permitted to chain any animal for longer than two consecutive hours. After two consecutive hours, owners would be required to relieve the animal from the tether for a minimum of one hour. Provisions under the law also stipulate conditions under which an animal can be tethered. For instance, the law would prohibit the tethering of an animal for more than six hours in a 24-hour period, between the hours of 10:00pm and 6:00am, in severe weather, or in an unsanitary environment. Violators of the law would be subject to a fine and possible seizure of animals from the property.

Take action. Residents of Ohio, contact your representatives and urge them to pass H.B. 94, also known as the Animal Protection Initiative.

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New Texas Bill Would Create Statewide Felony Animal Abuser Registry

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To Texas Representative Jennifer Farrar for introducing a bill that would create a public registry of felony animal cruelty convictions.

Willfully violent acts towards animals are well-known precursors to other forms of serious crime.

Willfully violent acts towards animals are well-known precursors to other forms of serious crime.

According a recent news article, a new bill in the Texas legislature could improve monitoring of animal abusers by law enforcement and make the identities of convicted abusers known to the public. If H.B. 235 is passed, adults convicted of  felony animal cruelty in the state of Texas would be legally required to register each year with law enforcement. The offender’s name, address, and photograph would then be submitted to the Texas Department of Public Safety and entered into a database. A similar type of registry is widely employed by law enforcement on a state level to monitor sex offenders after release from prison. As with sex offender registries, registries of felony animal cruelty convictions would help law enforcement officers better ensure that offenders are abiding by the terms of their release. Furthermore, a public registry would be an enormous asset to animal shelters screening potential adopters, pet owners seeking pet sitters, and other individuals and organizations with vested interest in the welfare of animals. Lastly, acts of animal cruelty are well-known precursors to other serious crimes. For this reason, felony animal cruelty offenders should be monitored by law enforcement and be made known to the public to the fullest reasonable extent.

Take Action: Texas residents, contact your representative and urge them to support H.B. 235. Obtain your representative’s contact information here.

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