When you think about it…geography shouldn’t determine whether a dog lives or dies.

Dogs in rural shelters may face a higher risk of euthanasia.

Dogs in rural shelters may face a higher risk of euthanasia.

If a dog is born in a rural area and winds up in a shelter, he or she is more likely to be euthanized. Euthanasia rates in rural shelters may run as high as 95 percent, meaning that out of every 100 dogs who enter the shelter, only five leave alive. Why?

 

Low-cost spay/neuter programs are prevalent in populated areas but not in rural areas. Also, there are more people to adopt shelter animals in populated areas than in rural areas. So, basically, it’s a numbers game and unfortunately the animals found in less populated areas stand less of a chance of ever reaching adulthood.

 

Rescue groups often transport animals from rural areas to heavily populated areas where their chances of finding a forever home are assured. Furthermore, these animals are either spayed/neutered before transport or immediately after, thus ensuring they won’t be able to reproduce.

 

While these transports are lifesavers for the animals who find a space on the van, there are still too many healthy, well-behaved, adoptable animals losing their lives, every second of every day—all because of where they live. So, when you think about it…geography shouldn’t determine whether a dog lives or dies—but unfortunately it does.

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