U.S. District Judge Restores Federal Protections to Gray Wolves in Wyoming

pawsupPaws Up!
To U.S. District Court Judge Amy B. Jackson for restoring federal protections to wolves in Wyoming.

Gray wolves are once again an endangered species in Wyoming.

Gray wolves are once again an endangered species in Wyoming.

In 2013, the United States Fish and Wildlife Service proposed an action to delist the gray wolf  in every state  where the species exists. The previous year, the state of Wyoming resumed control over the state’s  gray wolf population after the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service delisted them as a federally protected endangered species in the state.

On September 23, 2014, U.S. District Court Judge Amy B. Jackson reversed the action to delist gray wolves in the state of Wyoming. Under her ruling, she stated the USFWS had erred in accepting non-binding promises from the state of Wyoming to maintain wolf populations. Wyoming’s wolf management plan permitted licensed hunting and permitted citizens in many parts of the state to shoot a wolf on sight. Hunting and on-sight killing of wolves will be illegal now that the wolf is once again an endangered species in the state of Wyoming.

Take Action: Contact the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service and express your support of federal protections for gray wolves in every state in their range.

Director Daniel M. Ashe
U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service
1849 C Street NW Washington DC 20240

Gillnets Kill

All sea turtles in American waters are classified as endangered species.

All sea turtles living within American waters are protected under the Endangered Species Act.

California legislators have before them AB 2019, a bill that would ban drift gillnet fishing in waters off California. Gillnets, which may be a mile long, snare more than their intended target, and also trap sea turtles, sperm whales, dolphins, sea lions, and other non-targeted fish. Some of those trapped are endangered species and must be saved from further destruction.

California residents, please contact your legislators and urge them to support AB 2019.

 

Wolves Need Help Now

Wolves are a top predator and, as such, are important to the ecological balance of a region. Removing wolves from the Endangered Species List would upset that balance.

wolf

Wolves occupy a vital part of the food chain.

The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (FWS) has proposed removing protections for wolves in the rest of the lower 48 states, having already stripped wolves of their protection in the Northern Rockies and Great Lakes.

Please let the FWS know you want wolves protected. Comments are being accepted by FWS until March 27. Write the director of FWS now.

Daniel M. Ashe, Director
U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service
1849 C Street, NW, Room 3358
Washington, DC 20240-0001

Corals Need Our Help

You can help keep a part of our natural world, Coral Reefs, thriving for future generations.

You can help keep a part of our natural world, Coral Reefs, thriving for future generations.

Sixty-six of the most threatened corals need protection under the Endangered Species Act. The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) has the ability to protect them. Coral reefs are in trouble due to ocean warming, acidification, and pollution.

We must protect endangered and near-endangered species and their habitat; for whenever we save a species from the brink of extinction and preserve enough of the habitat for the species to thrive, we keep a part of our natural world intact for future generations.

For these reasons, it is imperative that NOAA protect 66 of the most threatened corals immediately. Please write NOAA requesting the agency act quickly and decisively to spare further loss of coral reefs. Visit the agency’s website

to learn more about its coral reef conservation program.

Dr. Jane Lubchenco
Undersecretary of Commerce for Oceans and Atmosphere
and Administrator
National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration
1401 Constitution Avenue, NW
Room 5128
Washington, DC 20230

Polar Bears Need Protection

Polar bears are threatened by both climate change and hunting.

Polar bears are threatened by both climate change and hunting.

In March, member nations will meet at the Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species (CITES) to discuss, among other topics, protections for polar bears. The global trade in polar bear pelts, claws, skulls, and other body parts must stop. Polar bears are in danger not just from this kind of global trafficking but also global climate change. There are an estimated 22,000 polar bears in 20 different populations worldwide.

Killing wildlife for sport is inherently cruel and uncivilized. Hunters who hunt for the thrill of the kill lose themselves in an ancient belief that humans rule over the animals. We do not. In reality, hunting disrupts migration and hibernation patterns. It decimates animal family units and degrades habitat. Trophy hunting, in particular, is an egregious form of killing as it involves going after big game and mounting all or part of the animal in a trophy or game room where the hunter’s weapons may also be on display.

Urge the prime minister of the United Kingdom to lead his country and the European Union toward a vote on strong protections for polar bears that will end the international trade in their body parts.

The Honorable David Cameron
Prime Minister
10 Downing Street
London
SW1A 2AA
England

Bluefin Tuna Need Protection

The giant schools of tuna that once populated the oceans are rapidly disappearing

The giant schools of tuna that once populated the oceans are rapidly disappearing

Threatened by climate change, overfishing, and pollution, bluefin tuna need protection in order to recover to healthy levels. Write the Canadian ministers of Environment and Fisheries and Oceans requesting they act now to protect bluefin tuna under the Species at Risk Act. Any delay further compromises the integrity of this long-lived giant ocean predator.

The Honourable Peter Kent
Minister of the Environment
Les Terrasses de la Chaudière
10 Wellington Street, 28th Floor
Gatineau, Quebec
K1A 0H3
Canada

The Honourable Keith Ashfield
Minister of Fisheries and Oceans
200 Kent Street
13th Floor, Station 13E228
Ottawa, Ontario K1A 0E6
Canada

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African Lions in Danger

Only with strict protection will future generations of lions roam freely in the wild.

Only with strict protection will future generations of lions roam freely in the wild.

African lions need protection under the U.S. Endangered Species Act (ESA). With fewer than 35,000 in the wild and with their numbers dwindling, without protection now, they may become extinct. While loss of habitat is one reason for their declining numbers, one of the bigger challenges to the species’ survival comes from the United States—the world’s largest importer of lion trophies and lion parts.

Urge the acting director of the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service to list the African lion under the ESA now.

Daniel M. Ashe, Director
U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service
1849 C Street, NW
Washington, DC 20240

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